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Media Coverage

6-Minute Spider-Man Preview in IMAX This Weekend

By Marvel on May 23, 2012

Fans who head out to see "Men in Black III" in IMAX 3D starting this Friday, May 25 will get a special sneak peak at "The Amazing Spider-Man" in theaters and IMAX 3D July 3! Read more on Marvel.com

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'Men in Black 3' to Open in 474 IMAX Theaters Worldwide

By Etan Vlessing on May 22, 2012

Columbia's alien adventure flick "Men in Black III" will open in 474 IMAX theaters worldwide this Friday, simultaneous with a North American wide release. The Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones- starrer will be released domestically in 278 theaters, and in another 196 IMAX theaters internationally. Read more on HollywoodReporter.com

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Take an inside look at the new IMAX Theatre at Celebration! Crossroads in Portage (video)

By John Liberty on May 16, 2012

 Celebration! Cinema posted today a time-lapse video of the installation of the new IMAX Theater at Celebration! Crossroads in Portage.The Grand Rapids-based company plans to hold the grand opening of the 42-foot-tall by 64-foot-wide screen on May 25 with "Men In Black 3," said vice president of marketing Steve VanWagoner. He said today the theater is undergoing sound adjustments, finishing the floor and installing seats.VanWagoner said he hopes to show "Marvel's The Avengers" this weekend, but it's not a guarantee. "We're hoping for this weekend, but if it doesn't happen, it could be Monday or Tuesday. We're just not sure right now with all the details we have right now," he said. For now, take a look at the video to see what's to come. Read more on mlive.com

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IMAX Corporation Reports First Quarter 2012 Financial Results

By IMAX on April 26, 2012

IMAX Corporation today reported first quarter 2012 revenues of $55.6 million, adjusted EBITDA as calculated in accordance with the Company's Credit Facility of $16.4 million, adjusted net income of $4.0 million, or $0.06 per diluted share, and reported net income of $2.6 million, or $0.04 per diluted share.  In the first quarter of 2012, the Company incurred a charge of $0.7 million to enable certain theatres to play movies, such as The Dark Knight Rises, in either digital or analog format.  For reconciliations of adjusted net income to reported net income and for the definition of adjusted EBITDA, please see the tables at the end of this press release. "Our first quarter financial results were driven by strong year-over-year increases in recurring revenues, which reflects the powerful combination of film performance and our growing worldwide theatre network, the key ingredients of our business model," said IMAX Chief Executive Officer, Richard L. Gelfond. "Our rapid global expansion has led to 32% commercial network growth versus the same time last year.  In addition, the box office momentum we experienced in the first quarter has continued into the second quarter, with gross box office to date up roughly 500% versus the same period last year and the summer movie season still ahead.  We believe that the momentum we are currently experiencing, together with our growing network, backlog of theatres, cutting-edge technology and the introduction of our new brand campaign should result in continued growth over the long-term." Read more on PRNewswire.com

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A Polar Bear and Her Cubs are the Stars of 'To the Arctic'

By IMAX on April 20, 2012

A polar bear and her cubs are the stars of 'To the Arctic'

Father-son filmmakers Greg and Shaun MacGillivray head to the Arctic for an Imax documentary on temperature changes and turn the spotlight on a polar bear family.>

By Susan King, Los Angeles Times

April 19, 2012


Polar bears tend to be camera shy, which caused problems for the filmmakers of the newWarner Bros./Imax adventure"To the Arctic,"opening Friday.

The 40-minute 3-D documentary examines extreme temperature changes in the Arctic, which has led to the permanent ice pack melting quickly and endangering the existence of animals such as polar bears, caribou, seals, walruses and birds that are indigenous to the region.

Narrated by Meryl Streep, "To the Arctic" is the latest movie from two-time Oscar-nominated filmmaker Greg MacGillivray ("The Living Sea," "Dolphins") and his producer son, Shaun MacGillivray ("Grand Canyon Adventure: River at Risk"). The film's editor, Stephen Judson, wrote the script.

The production lasted four years, including eight months on location in the Arctic — but for the first six trips, the filmmakers were unable to get any usable footage of polar bear mothers and cubs, the animals most closely associated with the Arctic.

"When it comes to wildlife filmmaking, you can have the best script in the world but you don't know what you are going to get until you are there," said Shaun. "We got incredible footage of caribou herds, good stories with other animals like the walrus and great aerial photography."

Then, on their last trip in 2010, the crew spent a month on a 130-foot ice breaker, the MS Havsel, in and around the seas of Svalbard, Norway. That is where they found their stars.

"We were with them for five days straight," Shaun said. "We got that incredible sense of both being emotionally connected to them, but also what it was like for a single mom polar bear to be raising two cubs in an environment that gets harder every day."

At one point, the ice floe the bears were resting on floated within 20 feet of the ice breaker. "Even then she would sniff at us, but she wasn't freaked," said Greg. "The captain of the boat ... he felt after observing her for a couple of days that 'this is the smartest bear I have ever been around. She is not expending energy to get away from us all. Bears I have seen expend energy — they jump in the water, they swim away and they walk along the ice floe to get away. But she said I am not going to expend any energy to get away from this boat. I am comfortable.'''

Extremely comfortable.

The first day they saw the trio, the mother and her cubs were sleeping and playing when suddenly, she began to dig a hole in the ice. "I said, 'Why is she doing that?' Maybe there is a seal there," said Greg.

But that wasn't the case. She actually fashioned a chair out of the hole. "She lounged back in the air and she huffed," said the director. "It was a certain kind of huff and all of a sudden, the two cubs came running over and it was time to nurse. She was on her back, vulnerable as she could be with her nose — which is more or less her early warning device — lower, not high like they want it to be. The captain was right. This is an exceptional bear. This is our story. We got to stay next to these bears as long as we possibly could. It was an exceptional experience."

There are many "Aww" moments in the film with the cubs rough-housing and playing hide and seek on the ice floe. One of the cubs loves to play with its own paw.

But there was a lot of heavy drama because the bears' primary food source, seals, are not as plentiful as they once were. So male polar bears are now devouring bear cubs for sustenance. The MacGillivrays were able to capture frantic moments when the mother bear was trying desperately to save her cubs. "Our hearts were in our throats," Shaun said, especially because their rule as filmmakers is that they can't interfere with Mother Nature.

Each time, though the mother bear was able to hold off the attack. "She was just so amazing to be able to stand up to the male polar bear and be able to communicate with her cubs to always stay in front of her," said Shaun.

"You just go, 'Wow. That is true courage and true love,'" Greg said.

Read Full Article Here: LA Times

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