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Media Coverage

How the Dark Knight Rose in IMAX

By Stephen Kelly on July 17, 2012

He's anti-3D, still shoots on film and believes in using as little CGI as possible -- Christopher Nolan is Hollywood's traditionalist. But for his latest, The Dark Knight Rises, Nolan needed an epic camera to match the scale of his vision for his third Batman film.

"The Imax cameras use 65-millimetre 15-perforation film advanced horizontally through the camera at 24 frames per second," explains David Keighley, Imax's chief quality officer. "The frames are nine times bigger than a traditional 35mm movie frame. For Chris [Nolan] it's the closest you can get to zooming down the road in the Batmobile." Please click here to read the entire article on Wired UK.

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The IMAX Difference, Blockbuster Size

By MEKADO MURPHY on July 16, 2012

IN 2008 the director Christopher Nolan’s “Dark Knight,” the second in his trilogy of Batman movies, introduced some audiences to a character not before seen in the franchise, or any studio narrative feature until that time. But that character wasn’t on the screen. It was the screen.

That would be Imax, a vast screen that can be as tall as an eight-story building. Though the name is popularly used to refer to screens, it is primarily a format involving special cameras and large-scale film, and before “Dark Knight” it had been known best for short documentaries about ocean life and space travel. Mr. Nolan shot parts of “The Dark Knight” using Imax cameras, with 30 minutes of such footage making it into the final film. When those images were seen in an Imax theater, they filled the screen from top to bottom with a giant, high-resolution image.

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The Dark Knight Rises: Film Review

By Todd McCarthy on July 15, 2012

The Bottom Line: A truly grand finale raises Christopher Nolan's Batman trilogy to the peak of big-screen comic book adaptations.

The real world threats of terrorism, political anarchy and economic instability make deep incursions into the cinematic comic book domain in The Dark Knight Rises. Big-time Hollywood filmmaking at its most massively accomplished this last installment of Christopher Nolan's Batman trilogy makes everything in the rival Marvel universe look thoroughly silly and childish. Entirely enveloping and at times unnerving in a relevant way one would never have imagined, as a cohesive whole this ranks as the best of Nolan's trio, even if it lacks -- how could it not? -- an element as unique as Heath Ledger's immortal turn in The Dark Knight. It's a blockbuster by any standard. 

The director daringly pushes the credibility of a Gotham City besieged by nuclear-armed revolutionaries to such an extent that it momentarily seems absurd that a guy in a costume who refuses to kill people could conceivably show up to save the day. This is especially true since Nolan, probably more than any other filmmaker who's ever gotten seriously involved with a superhero character, has gone so far to unmask and debilitate such a figure. But he gets away with it and, unlike some interludes in the previous films, everything here is lucid, to the point and on the mark, richly filling out (especially when seen in the IMAX format) every moment of the 164-minute running time.

Please click here for the entire article.

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Christian Bale: 'Dark Knight Rises' Goes Full Circle

By Bruce Kirkland on July 13, 2012

LOS ANGELES - Christopher Nolan's Batman trilogy is now complete with The Dark Knight Rises, a mega-movie with a staggering $250-million budget. This is it, the end, the final time Christian Bale dons the batsuit and sweats under the cowl that so suffocated him on the first film. Never again...

But is it really the end?

"In terms of Chris," Bale says in an exclusive one-on-one interview, "I think he's made it pretty clear -- which is unusual for Chris -- that this would be the last one. And I'm really the wrong person to ask because it's never been something that I've been involved with, talking about, shall we or shan't we."

But Bale leaves a window open, a glimmer of light suggesting he would play the character again if Nolan asked.

"I just want for Chris to tell me he's got a story and I go read it and it's: 'Oh great, let's go do it!' If he comes up with a great story ... I'm just the wrong guy to be asking about that. It's all down to Chris.

"But my understanding is that he's pretty clear. In my conversations with him, this is it, this is how it was meant to be. But there's always the temptation: How far can you push it? Then there's: No, if it's good, leave it, walk away at that moment. Don't wait until you start making mistakes." Read more on the Toronto Sun website.

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Exclusive: 'The Dark Knight Rises' IMAX 12:01 Poster Premiere!

By John Halecky on July 10, 2012

The kind folks over at IMAX have given us the exclusive IMAX 12:01 poster premiere for The Dark Knight Rises, opening in theaters Fri., July 20th. Exclusively for IMAX fans – those attending The Dark Knight Rises IMAX midnight shows in the first hours of July 20th will receive this exclusive, limited edition print featuring Gotham City’s newest super villain, “BANE” (Tom Hardy). Read more on Fandango.com

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